Daily 49er

“The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

The film about a film brings in comedy’s best.

James+Franco+plays+the+protagonist+Tommy+Wiseau+in+%E2%80%9CThe+Disaster+Artist.%E2%80%9D
James Franco plays the protagonist Tommy Wiseau in “The Disaster Artist.”

James Franco plays the protagonist Tommy Wiseau in “The Disaster Artist.”

Justina Mintz

Justina Mintz

James Franco plays the protagonist Tommy Wiseau in “The Disaster Artist.”

Advertisement

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Print Friendly, PDF & Email

As we progress further into the 21st century, you’re likely to find fewer and fewer people who have heard of Tommy Wiseau’s early 2000s cult classic “The Room,” let alone actually watched it. It’s a cultural experience and cinematic phenomenon in itself to watch what has been deemed “The Citizen Kane of Bad Movies.”

The Disaster Artist,” James Franco’s latest project, explores the making of the infamous film, particularly through the complex relationship that develops between Tommy Wiseau and fellow actor and friend Greg Sestero (Dave Franco). The film, which he directed and starred in as Tommy Wiseau, explores the unconventional and sometimes questionable methods used in the making of the movie.

The original film made very little sense and the acting was far from Oscar-worthy, but the process and creativity behind “The Room” is one that has earned Wiseau a lifetime cult status, as theatres to this day continue to sell out screenings nationwide.

Like Wiseau himself, James Franco is transparent and ambitious with his approach to the role, embodying everything from Wiseau’s physical traits to his odd mannerisms. He taps into Wiseau’s mystery accent and the iconic black outfit that makes Wiseau’s character stand alone from the rest of the film’s characters. His realistic portrayal of the actor brings to life a unique story about a man who against all odds, finds a community of people who admire his work and eventually make him famous.

Some recurring themes, such as the constant mystery of Wiseau’s age or where he is from, contribute to the phenomenon of the film’s success as fans of the original film take a peek behind the curtain.

Standout performances include Dave Franco, a familiar face in modern comedy, taking on a similarly misunderstood character as the role of Sestero, Wiseau’s best friend in the movie and in real life. A man who is loyal and fully devoted to his craft, Dave Franco’s portrayal of Sestero is a light and palpable contrast to James Franco’s over-the-top but authentic portrayal of Wiseau. The relationship between the two characters is one that evokes frustration, empathy and joy all at once as their journey to finishing “The Room” goes on.

While comedic and light in tone, the film does a good job veering into more serious topics such as struggling with self image and dealing with failure.

Every detail in “The Disaster Artist” is intentional and well done, a feat important to fans of the movie who have seen it dozens of times and respect Wiseau as a filmmaker. Everything from lighting to camera angles and script delivery is almost identical to the original film, as seen in the film’s ending scene through a dual frame side-by-side comparison of the original versus James Franco’s reenactment. In a time where remakes are often not well-received, the execution of every last meticulous detail that has made the movie what it is today are appreciated.

With appearances by the Franco brothers’ regular line-up of comedic actors as well as a few others, including Zac Efron, Josh Hutcherson, Seth Rogen and Alison Brie, the significance of “The Room” in Hollywood is apparent to both fans and members of the film industry.  

Even those unfamiliar with the film can appreciate the often-unseen portrayal of Hollywood and the realistic struggle actors go through to make it in the industry. The story on its own stands strong against Franco’s other projects as he proves time and time again the vast diversity of roles he can tackle.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    LBSU exchange students tell the tale of two cities

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    Humor is in the eye of the beholder

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    La Raza’s spoken word event inspires people of color writers

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    Grab your popcorn, the largest student film festival is coming to Long Beach

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    Pa’s Pumpkin Patch is a wholesome Halloween celebration

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    In Photos: Graduate student uses humor to translate through his art

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    ‘Bad Times at the El Royale’ is anything but

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    ‘Quavo Huncho’ is a big, bland boring mess

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    LGBTQ activist Harvey Milk remembered in Cal Rep’s production of ‘Dear Harvey’

  • “The Disaster Artist” is one of James Franco’s best biographical adaptations

    Arts & Life

    Student artists display pieces at the Long Beach Airport for visitors on the move