BOT confirms Conoley’s salary, discusses bottlenecks

Todd Johnson

Cal State Board of Trustees meet in the Dumke Auditorium during Wednesday’s meeting in Long Beach.

Scott Bosco, Assistant City Editor

Incoming Cal State Long Beach President Jane Close Conoley’s annual salary of $320,329 was confirmed at the Cal State University Board of Trustees meeting Wednesday.

Conoley will begin receiving her annual salary July 15.

The Board approved her compensation amid discussions of bottleneck courses and cooperation among the state’s three higher education systems: the CSU, University of California and California Community Colleges.

At the meeting, the Committee on Educational Policy also presented new strategies to resolve impacted classes in the CSU.

An updated summer 2013 bottleneck survey showed that the majority of impacted classes were upper division courses, those affecting juniors and seniors.

Gerry Hanley, assistant vice chancellor of academic technology services, said that bottleneck courses could be completely eliminated by 2017 if eAdvising, online courses and hiring of additional faculty are implemented system wide.

A joint presentation by education leaders including CSU Chancellor Timothy P. White, University of California President Janet Napolitano and California Community Colleges Chancellor Brice W. Harris, discussed steps for improved collaboration on K-12 outreach, business services and transfers between systems.

“Our central challenge is how to provide the same level of opportunity to future generations,” Napolitano said. “One of our key initiatives focuses on streamlining and improving transfers.”

The three higher education systems also said they plan to work together to save money by purchasing products in bulk from vendors like Dell.

Napolitano added that last July the three systems came together for the first ever Shared Services Conference and have also joined forces to increase energy efficiency. Napolitano said in the past five years, the UC and CSU’s energy efficiency project has resulted in the reduction 150,000 metric tons of carbon.

“A spirit of cooperation has existed for a long time,” Harris said. “Our institutions are joined at the hip. The better we cooperate in restoring access to all three of our segments, the better for California.”

The Board also gave a posthumous conferral of Emeritus to former CSU Trustee William Hauck, who passed away this month after an eight-month battle with cancer.

White joined Linscheid and Hauck’s wife at the podium to bestow the title.

“He was focused on one thing and one thing only, and that was creating access to high-quality education for all of California,” White said. “So if we do anything right in the years and decades ahead, it will be for all of us to think about Bill.”

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