Letter to the Editor: Prop. 30 money should be used to fund education

Bob Huff & Jaivon Grant
April 14, 2013
Filed under Letters to the Editor, Opinions

Prop. 30 money should be used to fund education

While campaigning for Proposition 30, California university students were enthusiastically reminded by Gov. Jerry Brown that the new tax hikes would “send a message to the rest of the country that we as a people can invest together in our schools…” and that “education has to be number one.”

Cal State University students were promised money from Prop. 30 would be used to fund education. As a result, students helped the governor pass the tax increases by supporting it at the ballot.

It was only after Prop. 30 passed that we found out the governor’s enthusiasm for education doesn’t quite match his budget. The governor’s budget provides CSU campuses with only a combined total of $125 million, 2 percent of the $6.5 billion. Of the $125 million, the CSU administration is taking half of that money for pay raises and more health benefits. So now, students are left with $62 million, or one percent.  

Californians and CSU students were never told Prop. 30 money would be used to give out pay raises.  

There are plenty of college students who work part-time and full-time jobs who have noticed their paycheck is a little bit smaller this year.  Those students didn’t get a raise – they were told by the governor that if Prop. 30 passed it would help ease tuition costs. Brown needs to keep that promise. 

Good employees deserve a raise once in a while, but why should it be on the backs of students? Shouldn’t the hard-working students who helped pass these tax increases benefit? 

CSU students have endured nearly a billion in budget cuts over the last six years.  

Without a doubt, those cuts have harmed the education system. The graduation rate for Latinos at CSU is just 10 percent, and the graduation rate for African-Americans is a dismal 8 percent. These students have been let down by a system that fails to prioritize education. 

Education should be a top priority in our budget – this includes K-12 and higher education. Instead, the governor went in the opposite direction by funding state employees and a high speed rail with Prop. 30 dollars, before ensuring our students have been taken care of. 

As a CSU student and as a lawmaker in Sacramento, we call on the governor to fully fund education before he funds other projects. The governor should dedicate 100 percent of Prop. 30 money to education like he promised. Anything else shows education is simply not a priority for California’s public leaders.  

Senator Bob Huff is the California Senate Republican Leader and Jaivon Grant is a sophomore biology major at Cal State Long Beach.While campaigning for Proposition 30, California university students were enthusiastically reminded by Gov. Jerry Brown that the new tax hikes would “send a message to the rest of the country that we as a people can invest together in our schools…” and that “education has to be number one.”

Cal State University students were promised money from Prop. 30 would be used to fund education. As a result, students helped the governor pass the tax increases by supporting it at the ballot.

It was only after Prop. 30 passed that we found out the governor’s enthusiasm for education doesn’t quite match his budget. The governor’s budget provides CSU campuses with only a combined total of $125 million, 2 percent of the $6.5 billion. Of the $125 million, the CSU administration is taking half of that money for pay raises and more health benefits. So now, students are left with $62 million, or one percent.
Californians and CSU students were never told Prop. 30 money would be used to give out pay raises.

There are plenty of college students who work part-time and full-time jobs who have noticed their paycheck is a little bit smaller this year. Those students didn’t get a raise – they were told by the governor that if Prop. 30 passed it would help ease tuition costs. Brown needs to keep that promise.

Good employees deserve a raise once in a while, but why should it be on the backs of students? Shouldn’t the hard-working students who helped pass these tax increases benefit?

CSU students have endured nearly a billion in budget cuts over the last six years.
Without a doubt, those cuts have harmed the education system. The graduation rate for Latinos at CSU is just 10 percent, and the graduation rate for African-Americans is a dismal 8 percent. These students have been let down by a system that fails to prioritize education.

Education should be a top priority in our budget – this includes K-12 and higher education. Instead, the governor went in the opposite direction by funding state employees and a high speed rail with Prop. 30 dollars, before ensuring our students have been taken care of.

As a CSU student and as a lawmaker in Sacramento, we call on the governor to fully fund education before he funds other projects. The governor should dedicate 100 percent of Prop. 30 money to education like he promised. Anything else shows education is simply not a priority for California’s public leaders.

Senator Bob Huff is the California Senate Republican Leader and Jaivon Grant is a sophomore biology major at Cal State Long Beach.
 

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