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Scamming people where the sun don’t shine: toilet paper

Talk about taking a load off

Judith Haeusler for Stone

Jack Chavdarian, Staff Writer

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More than a dozen residents in West Palm Beach, Fla. were scammed into buying special toilet paper in order to avert septic tank damage. 

In some cases, 70 years worth of toilet paper was purchased, which is like harboring a ship the size of the Titanic.

According to the Huffington Post, three septic tank employees fooled customers into purchasing $1 million in the useless products because of fabricated federal regulations on toilet paper. 

There are no current federal regulations on septic tank products.

All three pleaded guilty in federal court to conspiring to commit wire fraud and face up to 20 years in prison.

Sentencing will take place in February.

What a stinky mess!

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